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Aug 6, 2023Liked by Kyle Thiermann

The whole introduction of the Pearl, written the year I was born, is a book in itself, describing in addition to the Pearl's subtext, also the entire life of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author, a writer who depicted wealth as not necessarily something to be lusted after. Don't miss it. The pearl, found by a man in a small Mexican community represents that which all humankind thinks will alleviate their unhappiness, discomfort, insecurity, and lack of self-worth. Instead it only magnifies them. Go figger. As far as passages go, how can you beat the tension of a man's wrath after a scorpion has stung his baby child lying helplessly in the crib.

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Aug 8, 2023Liked by Kyle Thiermann

I love this paragraph describing the doctor’s house: “The scurrying procession came at last to the big gate in the wall of the doctor’s house. They could hear the splashing water and the singing of caged birds and the sweep of the long brooms on the flagstones. And they could smell the frying of good bacon from the doctor’s house.” Using smell and sounds paints just as good as picture than if Steinbeck had just described it visually.

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So far I've really enjoyed the repetitive metaphors of music used by the author. "In his mind a new song had come, the Song of Evil, the music of the enemy..." p.6, "And the music of the pearl rose like a chorus of trumpets in his ears." p. 26. Let's see what other tunes the pearl will bring to the protagonist.

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